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Syrian Refugee Families in Iceland

General

Project start
01.01.2016
Project end
31.12.2017
Type of project
ARMAP/NSF
Project theme
Society, economy and culture
Project topic
Culture & history

Fieldwork / Study

Fieldwork country
Iceland
Fieldwork region
Iceland
Fieldwork location

Geolocation is 65.68399810791, -18.11000061035

Fieldwork start
02.08.2016
Fieldwork end
10.08.2016

SAR information

Fieldwork / Study

Fieldwork country
Iceland
Fieldwork region
Iceland
Fieldwork location

Geolocation is 64.06764, -21.95773

Fieldwork start
20.07.2016
Fieldwork end
29.07.2016

SAR information

Fieldwork / Study

Fieldwork country
Iceland
Fieldwork region
Iceland
Fieldwork location

Geolocation is 64.11, -21.94

Fieldwork start
30.07.2016
Fieldwork end
02.08.2016

SAR information

Fieldwork / Study

Fieldwork country
Iceland
Fieldwork region
Iceland
Fieldwork location

Geolocation is 65.68399810791, -18.11000061035

Fieldwork start
23.01.2017
Fieldwork end
01.02.2017

SAR information

Fieldwork / Study

Fieldwork country
Iceland
Fieldwork region
Iceland
Fieldwork location

Geolocation is 64.06764, -21.95773

Fieldwork start
02.01.2017
Fieldwork end
11.01.2017

SAR information

Fieldwork / Study

Fieldwork country
Iceland
Fieldwork region
Iceland
Fieldwork location

Geolocation is 64.11, -21.94

Fieldwork start
12.01.2017
Fieldwork end
22.01.2017

SAR information

Project details

02.09.2019
Science / project plan

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Science / project summary
This award supports data collection on Syrian refugees' experience being accepted by Iceland. The conflict in Syria has added to a global refugee crisis that is one of the largest in history with an estimated 20 million known refugees currently displaced. While Syrian refugees were forced from their country due to war, it is estimated that by the year 2050 potentially 200 million people could be displaced due to environmental change from a warming climate. These changes are not only affecting life-ways around the world but are also influencing the role of nations in these crises. In early 2016, Iceland received Syrian refugee families and placed them in three Icelandic communities. Now is an exceptional time to examine Iceland's reaction and capacity to address forced migration into the Arctic. There is great potential in Iceland to serve as a global model as it determines policies, procedures, and communications among the stakeholders for developing best-practices for addressing the challenges of refugees and forced migration. Providing culturally effective services to a population that continuously changes in country of origin, language needs, health and mental health needs, and cultural experiences will be a significant problem for service providers around the world. Knowledge gained through this research has the potential to provide critical insights other nations facing similar crises. This project will examine service provision to refugees and their families (language services, social services, health services, education, job training) in Iceland. The broader impact of this research project is in its potential to contribute to the development of effective and culturally appropriate services for refugees. The PI will conduct qualitative interviews with refugees and providers twice in a 12-month period starting in the summer of 2016 through the winter of 2017. This project will build on early data collected in the winter of 2016, as Iceland prepared for the arrival of Syrian families. The research was supported by Iceland's Ministry of Welfare that requested the PI of this project, a Fulbright Specialist in refugee resettlement, meet with providers and administrators from welfare, education, health, and other agencies that would be involved in the resettlement of the Syrian refugee families. The PI facilitated discussions on the needs of the service providers and communities who would be receiving refugee families. This project will continue those discussions six months after the Syrian families’ arrival and then 12 months after the arrival. This research has the potential to inform healthcare providers, social service workers and administrators, policy makers, educators, and community agencies on the development of best practices in resettling refugees and forced migrants.
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